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Tuesday, 27 June 2017

Garage & Shed breaks

The Police have received an increase in reports of sheds and garages being broken into recently. Please review your security and read the follow advice to reduce the chances of being a victim of this type of crime.

Opportunist thieves identify sheds and garages as easy pickings because they are usually fairly unprotected and lack basic security measures. The buildings often contain property that can be sold on or implements that can be used to force entry into the owner’s home. Many people fall short on basic security of their sheds and garages.

• Keep your shed/garage in good condition.
• Fit a closed shackle padlock to the door.
• Fittings should be bolted through the door and any screws concealed.
• It is easy to unscrew the ironmongery, steal contents and in some cases replace the screws to make it look as if the shed has not been tampered with.
• By using tamper proof screws or coach bolts, together with a good quality pad bar or hasp and staple and close shackled padlock, the shed owner will make it harder for the would-be thief.
• Bond any window glass in with mastic to prevent easy removal. Fit grilles or mesh to windows to slow down the thief.
• Ensure all equipment and tools are locked away when not in use.
• Install a shed/garage alarm.
• Post-code or mark all property such as lawnmowers, bikes, and tools using ultraviolet pens, forensic marking such as Selecta DNA, Smartwater or engravers.
• Install security lighting as a deterrent, and plants such as thorny shrubs to act as a barrier at potential access points.
• If building a shed, put it where it is most visible to you and neighbours.
• Ensure ladders are locked to a secure fixture in the shed or garage so they can’t be used to reach top floor windows.
• Chain large items such as bicycles together, making it much more difficult for a thief to carry away.
• Fit a wire cage inside a shed where more expensive items can be locked away.
• No thief wants to hang about longer than they have to so delay the time it will take them to get their hands on your tools

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Water Safety

This hot weather has encouraged people to cool off in rivers, canals, ponds, quarries and lakes. Please be mindful that this can be very dangerous.

Dangers of open water:
  • The water may look calm on the surface, but there can be strong undercurrents that could pull even a strong swimmer under the water.
  • The water may feel warm on the surface, but just a few feet below the surface it can be icy cold.  The cold water can affect stamina and strength of swimmers.

Key safety tips for staying safe near water:
 
  • Alcohol and swimming do not mix! Stay out of the water if you have been drinking.
  • Never let any children swim in unsupervised areas like quarries, canals or ponds.
  • Never interfere with lifesaving equipment - you might need it yourself.
  • Swimming anywhere other than at purpose built and supervised swimming pools is highly dangerous and is not recommended, unless as part of an organised club.

Parents please make sure your children are aware of the dangers!

It is Drowning Prevention Week please visit http://www.rlss.org.uk for more info.


For more water safety advice please visit: http://www.rlss.org.uk/water-safety/water-safety/

Tuesday, 13 June 2017

Online Fraud


Fraudsters have been advertising vehicles and machinery for sale on various selling platforms online. The victims, after communicating via email with the fraudster, will receive a bogus email which purports to be from an established escrow provider (a third party who will keep the payment until the buying and selling parties are both happy with the deal).

These emails are designed to persuade victims to pay upfront, via bank transfer, before visiting the seller to collect the goods. The emails also claim that the buyer (victim) has a cooling off period to reclaim the payment if they change their mind. This gives victims the false sense of security that their money is being looked after by this trustworthy third party, when in fact it is not and the money has gone straight to the fraudster. 

Protect yourself: 
  • When making a large purchase such as a new car or machinery, always meet the seller face to face first and ask to see the goods before transferring any money. 
  • If you receive a suspicious email asking for payment, check for spelling, grammar, or any other errors, and check who sent the email. If in doubt, check feedback online by searching the associated phone numbers or email addresses of the seller. 
  • Contact the third party the fraudsters are purporting to be using to make the transaction. They should be able to confirm whether the email you have received is legitimate or not. 
  • False adverts often offer vehicles or machinery for sale well below market value to entice potential victims; always be cautious. If it looks too good to be true then it probably is.
If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk, or by calling 0300 123 2040.

Wednesday, 7 December 2016

Drink and driving

Over the last week there have been two incidents involving drink and driving. The second resulted in a death.

People always ask me " how many drinks can I have before I'm over the limit" the answer is simple, non.

It doesn't matter how many you think you can handle, how close you live Etc. 

The only safe way is if your driving you don't drink. Simple.

I've been in the King William on many occasions and seen people drink three or four pints then drive back home. It takes minutes to walk, try it.

Thursday, 11 August 2016

Drone for sale


Online shopping websites are being utilised by fraudsters to advertise nonexistent drones of various specifications for competitive prices.

Drones are personal flying devices that often carry cameras and can be navigated remotely by smartphones or hand-held controllers. Fraudsters are capitalising on their recent popularity and advertising non-existent drones at a lower value than their recommended retail price to tempt buyers.

After victims agree to purchase the drone, the fraudsters request payment to be paid via bank transfer saying that it will quicken the delivery process. After transferring the money the buyers never receive the drone and the fraudster blocks the victim to prevent further conversation.

How to protect yourself: 

  • Check the validity of the post.
  • Avoid paying by bank transfer and instead use an online payment option such as PayPal, which helps to protect you.
  • Check feedback online by searching the associated phone numbers or email addresses of the seller. Feedback will give you useful information about recent transactions other buyers may have made.
  • If the item is below market value consider whether this is an opportunity too good to be true. 
  • If you have been affected by this, or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk

Thursday, 7 July 2016

Time for your holidays.

Now that summer is on the way people can become complacent about home security. The most common cases of opportunist summer burglary involve offenders that:
 

  • enter an insecure front door while residents are in the back garden
  • enter doors that are closed but unlocked at night while residents are asleep
  • reach through windows to take valuable items
Crime reduction advice
 

  • Ensure that windows and doors are closed and locked when you are out. Don’t leave small windows open believing them to be safe.
  • If you want to leave windows open while you sleep, fit window restrictors so they cannot be fully opened, or make sure they are not large enough to allow access to a burglar.
  • When out in your garden ensure that windows and doors to the front of the house are secure. It only takes a second for someone to get into your home and take things without you noticing.
  • Do not leave valuables on display in front of windows or in reach of open windows or doors.
  • Ensure that all barbecue and garden equipment and tools are securely locked up in a shed and out of sight. Tools can be used by the potential offender to break in to your home.
  • Consider fitting outside security lighting or a visible alarm to help deter burglars. Even using pea shingle or gravel on a driveway and spiky plants in garden beds can help.
  • Don’t leave any keys near entry points where they can be ‘fished’ or ‘hooked’ out through the window, letter box or cat flap.
  • Ensure any internal handle operated locks on UPVC doors are fully secured with a key.
Sheds - Easy pickings?

Offenders see sheds as easy pickings because they are unprotected and lack basic security measures. The buildings often contain property that can be sold on or implements that can be used to force entry into the owner’s home.
 

  • Many sheds whilst being of good construction fall short on basic security.
  • It is easy to unscrew the ironmongery, steal contents and in some cases replace the screws to make it look as if the shed has not been tampered with.
  • By using tamper proof screws or coach bolts together with a good quality pad bar or hasp and staple and close shackled padlock, the shed owner will make it harder for the would-be thief.
  • It is also a good idea to bond any window glass in, with mastic to prevent easy removal.
  • Ensure all tools and equipment are locked away when not in use.
  • High-quality locks should be used on doors. Windows can be fitted with a grille or, as a cheaper alternative, chicken wire, to slow a thief down.
  • A shed alarm can also be installed.
  • Post-coding or indelibly marking all property such as lawnmowers, bikes, and tools using ultra-violet pens, forensic marking such as Selecta DNA or Smartwater or engravers.
  • Installing security lighting as a deterrent, and plants such as thorny shrubs to act as a barrier at potential access points.
  • If building a shed, putting it where it is most visible to you and neighbours.
Going on holiday?
 

  • Make your home look occupied.
  • If you're out or going away, ask a trusted neighbour to open and close your curtains for you.
  • Ask a neighbour if they don't mind parking their car on your driveway and trimming your garden to make your home look occupied.
  • Cut the front and back lawns before you go away and trim any plants that burglars could hide behind.
  • Cancel milk and newspaper deliveries.
  • Before your holiday, don’t advertise that you are going away on Facebook, Twitter etc.

Monday, 4 July 2016

Inheritance Fraud


Inheritance fraud usually occurs when you are told that someone very rich has died and you are in line to receive a huge inheritance. A fraudster who claims to be a Business Relations Manager from an overseas bank or legal official contacts you through email or a letter stating that a person sharing your family name has died and left behind a vast amount of money. The fraudster suggests that as you share the same family name as the deceased, you can be the beneficiary of the estate and rather than handing any ‘Inheritance Tax’ over to the government you can split the inheritance with the fraudster.

The fraudster will emphasise the need for secrecy and warn you not to tell anyone else about the deal. To hurry you into making a hasty decision, they will also stress the need to act quickly.

If you respond to the fraudster, they will ask you to pay various fees – for example: taxes, legal fees, banking fees etc. – so they can release your non-existent inheritance. Each time you make a payment, the fraudsters will come up with a reason why the inheritance cannot be paid out unless you make another payment. If you ask, they will also give you reasons why the fees cannot be taken from your inheritance and have to be paid up front.

If you become reluctant to pay a fee or suggest you cannot afford it, the fraudsters will put pressure on you by reminding you how close you are to receiving a sum of money much greater than the fees you’ve already handed over, and of how much you’ve already paid out. The fraudsters may also ask for your bank details so they can pay the inheritance directly into your bank account. If you hand over your bank details, the fraudsters can use them to empty your account.

You could be a victim of inheritance fraud if:
 

  • You’ve received an email or letter informing you that someone you may be related to has died without leaving a will and you may be in line to inherit.
  • You’ve paid fees to ‘research specialists’ who offer to sell you an estate report that includes information on the inheritance and how you can claim it.

What should you do if you’re a victim of inheritance fraud?
 

  • End all further contact with the fraudsters. Don’t send them any more money. Don’t give them your bank details.
  • If you have already given the fraudsters your bank account details, alert your bank immediately.
  • If you receive any threats from the fraudsters once you have stopped co-operating with them, alert the police immediately.
  • Be aware that you’re now likely to be a target for other frauds. Fraudsters often share details about people they have successfully targeted or approached, using different identities to commit further frauds. People who have already fallen victim to fraudsters are particularly vulnerable to the fraud recovery fraud. This is when fraudsters contact people who’ve already lost money through fraud and claim to be law enforcement officers or lawyers. They’ll advise the victim that they can help them recover their lost money – but request a fee. 

Protect yourself against inheritance fraud

  • Although there are legitimate companies who make a living by tracking down heirs, they do not do it in this way. If you are asked for a fee for a report, it is very likely to be bogus.
  • Letters/documents provided by the fraudsters are generally badly written. Look out for spelling mistakes and poor grammar.
  • Beware if you are asked to contact a webmail address such as @Yahoo or @Hotmail. As a rule, legitimate law firms do not use them.
  • As in most cases of fraud, if the promise seems too good to be true, it most probably is.
  • If you have been affected by this fraud or any other scam, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk