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Tuesday, 27 June 2017

Garage & Shed breaks

The Police have received an increase in reports of sheds and garages being broken into recently. Please review your security and read the follow advice to reduce the chances of being a victim of this type of crime.

Opportunist thieves identify sheds and garages as easy pickings because they are usually fairly unprotected and lack basic security measures. The buildings often contain property that can be sold on or implements that can be used to force entry into the owner’s home. Many people fall short on basic security of their sheds and garages.

• Keep your shed/garage in good condition.
• Fit a closed shackle padlock to the door.
• Fittings should be bolted through the door and any screws concealed.
• It is easy to unscrew the ironmongery, steal contents and in some cases replace the screws to make it look as if the shed has not been tampered with.
• By using tamper proof screws or coach bolts, together with a good quality pad bar or hasp and staple and close shackled padlock, the shed owner will make it harder for the would-be thief.
• Bond any window glass in with mastic to prevent easy removal. Fit grilles or mesh to windows to slow down the thief.
• Ensure all equipment and tools are locked away when not in use.
• Install a shed/garage alarm.
• Post-code or mark all property such as lawnmowers, bikes, and tools using ultraviolet pens, forensic marking such as Selecta DNA, Smartwater or engravers.
• Install security lighting as a deterrent, and plants such as thorny shrubs to act as a barrier at potential access points.
• If building a shed, put it where it is most visible to you and neighbours.
• Ensure ladders are locked to a secure fixture in the shed or garage so they can’t be used to reach top floor windows.
• Chain large items such as bicycles together, making it much more difficult for a thief to carry away.
• Fit a wire cage inside a shed where more expensive items can be locked away.
• No thief wants to hang about longer than they have to so delay the time it will take them to get their hands on your tools

Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Water Safety

This hot weather has encouraged people to cool off in rivers, canals, ponds, quarries and lakes. Please be mindful that this can be very dangerous.

Dangers of open water:
  • The water may look calm on the surface, but there can be strong undercurrents that could pull even a strong swimmer under the water.
  • The water may feel warm on the surface, but just a few feet below the surface it can be icy cold.  The cold water can affect stamina and strength of swimmers.

Key safety tips for staying safe near water:
  • Alcohol and swimming do not mix! Stay out of the water if you have been drinking.
  • Never let any children swim in unsupervised areas like quarries, canals or ponds.
  • Never interfere with lifesaving equipment - you might need it yourself.
  • Swimming anywhere other than at purpose built and supervised swimming pools is highly dangerous and is not recommended, unless as part of an organised club.

Parents please make sure your children are aware of the dangers!

It is Drowning Prevention Week please visit for more info.

For more water safety advice please visit:

Tuesday, 13 June 2017

Online Fraud

Fraudsters have been advertising vehicles and machinery for sale on various selling platforms online. The victims, after communicating via email with the fraudster, will receive a bogus email which purports to be from an established escrow provider (a third party who will keep the payment until the buying and selling parties are both happy with the deal).

These emails are designed to persuade victims to pay upfront, via bank transfer, before visiting the seller to collect the goods. The emails also claim that the buyer (victim) has a cooling off period to reclaim the payment if they change their mind. This gives victims the false sense of security that their money is being looked after by this trustworthy third party, when in fact it is not and the money has gone straight to the fraudster. 

Protect yourself: 
  • When making a large purchase such as a new car or machinery, always meet the seller face to face first and ask to see the goods before transferring any money. 
  • If you receive a suspicious email asking for payment, check for spelling, grammar, or any other errors, and check who sent the email. If in doubt, check feedback online by searching the associated phone numbers or email addresses of the seller. 
  • Contact the third party the fraudsters are purporting to be using to make the transaction. They should be able to confirm whether the email you have received is legitimate or not. 
  • False adverts often offer vehicles or machinery for sale well below market value to entice potential victims; always be cautious. If it looks too good to be true then it probably is.
If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting, or by calling 0300 123 2040.